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Apparently all kart meets have controlled fuel now. I presume they are testing for additives against a control sample. When they tested us it seemed like a density or viscosity test. How does it work? What is the test they carry out? With people using different oils surely there is a variance? 

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Correction, all QLD kart meetings...

Start reading:   http://foxvalleykart.com/fuel1.html

What you'll learn is that the additives need to be used at levels greater than 10% to provide any gain whatsoever.  At those levels the additives are highly detectable with basic tests.

Some of the chemicals are cancer causing, I've never gone shopping for them but I highly doubt any of the dangerous ones are even available in Australia.

How does the use of a control servo stop someone from putting these additives into their fuel?

This is a very short answer .....

The reason we use a fuel from a single outlet is that when the sample is tested in a lab you get a fingerprint of the contents.  The cost is very high to determine what the contents actually are,  so if the initial test is to get a fingerprint of a competitors fuel and compare that to the fingerprint of the control fuel , then if there are components present in your fuel that are not in the sample you are done.  There is no need to pay for more tests to determine what you added because the rules say must use the control fuel ,  if yours does not then ........ 

The common tests used at the track are a measure of the dialectric ( conductivity ) of the fuel,  that's the Digatron's job.  Anything that makes fuel better is going to be more 'active' .  Next is a density test,  again the sample will have a certain density and if additives that are not petrol are in there the weight goes up or down.

It is pretty quick and simple testing,  and will find 95% of the wrong things.  The additives are very readily available, they are products used for other purposes in everyday life where they are not harmful if used for their intended purpose , but yes they are guaranteed carcinogenic when added to petrol and burnt  !!   

Ian do you know if oil brand and/or quantity will vary the digitron results?

If so, what is the margin for error if any?

I presume the device is zero'ed out with the control fuel (with or without oil?)

Is 98 octane from Shell likely to give a different result to 98 octane from BP allowing for the margin for error (if there is any allowable tolerance).

If you have to use a specified fuel then yes anything else , brand or grade and even from a different petrol station 50 miles away is going to give a different reading.  There is no tolerance on the Digatron and the specific gravity if you use the control fuel,  you need to read the exact same numbers.  But if you don't, although you will still be within the 40 point window of the Digatron by the general rules the fuel tester will be alerted that you have not used the control fuel and that's where the lab test will definitely pick it up.

Why anyone would even ask the question is what astounds me.  Don't do it is as plain and simple an instruction as I can offer.  I had a mate when I was just a kid who got caught cheating on fuel, obviously his parent did it not him, but even today 40 years later he is still trying to live down his nickname "orange juice".  Its not nice, and if it is your child that you are risking this with then absolutely shame on you.

The real lesson to learn is that the chemicals created in burning fuel with the additives do not hurt you today,  they are like lead or asbestos and the effect is not going to turn into something bad for a while,  but in 20 or 30 years time look out !!! 

I know someone who after a test was asked to show what oil they were using as it had affected the result or I presume showed a abnormal test result. That is why I was asking. Not for the intention of trying to find a loophole in the rules. Knowledge is power. I just wanted to understand how it worked so I know what is happening when I am pulled aside like that. I jwas just surprised oil had a impact on test result so why don't we have control oil? 

Thanks Morgan. might have to read that twice to get it all to sink in.

Morgan Jones said:

Correction, all QLD kart meetings...

Start reading:   http://foxvalleykart.com/fuel1.html

What you'll learn is that the additives need to be used at levels greater than 10% to provide any gain whatsoever.  At those levels the additives are highly detectable with basic tests.

Some of the chemicals are cancer causing, I've never gone shopping for them but I highly doubt any of the dangerous ones are even available in Australia.

How does the use of a control servo stop someone from putting these additives into their fuel?

There is a list of approved oils (non performance enhancing) you can use

http://www.karting.net.au/list-of-approved-oils-for-use-in-karting-...

Cheers Gergely. I never knew that. 

I think people are interested to understand how the test procedures work, not to find loop holes but to ensure the checks and procedures are performed correctly.

What happens when the tech dunks the digitron from one tank to the next without washing it and it goes in a doped fuel tank?  Surely that contamination would be moved from tank to tank.  Should it be washed between tests?

You wouldn't send a competitors engine out without checking the squish and timing and having them sure they understand how those tests and checks are performed.

Should competitors be checking their own fuel to ensure they are compliant and to ensure there are no surprises?



Ian Williams said:

If you have to use a specified fuel then yes anything else , brand or grade and even from a different petrol station 50 miles away is going to give a different reading.  There is no tolerance on the Digatron and the specific gravity if you use the control fuel,  you need to read the exact same numbers.  But if you don't, although you will still be within the 40 point window of the Digatron by the general rules the fuel tester will be alerted that you have not used the control fuel and that's where the lab test will definitely pick it up.

Why anyone would even ask the question is what astounds me.  Don't do it is as plain and simple an instruction as I can offer.  I had a mate when I was just a kid who got caught cheating on fuel, obviously his parent did it not him, but even today 40 years later he is still trying to live down his nickname "orange juice".  Its not nice, and if it is your child that you are risking this with then absolutely shame on you.

The real lesson to learn is that the chemicals created in burning fuel with the additives do not hurt you today,  they are like lead or asbestos and the effect is not going to turn into something bad for a while,  but in 20 or 30 years time look out !!! 

There is a procedure in the rule book. Should answer your questions regarding contamination.

From a previous rule book........

22.1
Fuel Testing
a)
The digatron DT15 or DT47 or FT
-
60 series fuel testing kit will be the official fuel testing method to be used by the AKA and the
SKC
. Prior to any test conducted,
Competitor
s mu
st acknowledge the type of fuel (i.e. PULP, E10 PULP, ELF
LMS
BFK07
) and
Testers must ensure the Digitron is not contaminated from any test on other types of fuels.
b)
Method
(i)
Rinse the Digitron probe in a reference sample of un
-
mixed fuel of the type being use
d by the
Competitor
.
Where the
Competitor
is using ELF
LMS
BFK07
, then un
-
mixed ELF
LMS
BFK07
must be used as the reference
sample.
Where the
Competitor
is using E10 PULP, then un
-
mixed E10 PULP of the same brand must be used as the
reference sample.
Where t
he
Competitor
is using non
-
ethanol blended PULP, then non
-
ethanol blended PULP from any of the major
fuel suppliers may be used as a reference sample.
(ii)
Set Digatron Meter to .000 in an un
-
mixed sample of the appropriate reference fuel.
(iii)
Conduct test on
Com
petitor
’s fuel either in the fuel tank or on a sample removed from the fuel tank.
(iv)
Should the first test fail, a second test to be conducted on a sample removed from the
Competitor
’s fuel tank. The
temperature of the zero sample and the
Competitor
’s sample
to be adjusted so that the temperature difference be
tween
the two does not exceed 3°C, (5.4°
F).
(v)
If the results from the second test from the Digatron DT15 or DT47 or FT
-
60 Series Meter be less than
-
5 or greater than
+40 units then it will be deemed to not

comp

Thanks Steve!  I didn't realise this was in the book.

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